13 Books to Excite and Exercise Your Right Brain
Categories: Creativity

13 Books to Excite and Exercise Your Right Brain

Right-brainers are adored for their exceptional artistic and empathetic tendencies. From designers of major fashion lines and movie stars to writers and creative makers, right-brainers can think outside of the box and easily relate to others, which are super powerful characteristics that are expected to become even more important in the future. Maximize your creativity, exercise and inspire your right brain with these 13 titles we hope to spy in your next shelfie!

1. A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future by Daniel H. Pink ($10): This research-based book explores six principles every one should master to be successful in work and life. Claiming that the future belongs to artists, inventors, storytellers and creatives, right-brained readers will surely relate.

2. Creative Confidence: Unleashing the Creative Potential Within Us All by Tom Kelly and David Kelly ($8): Penned by a set of wildly successful brothers, this book shows that everyone can access the right side of their brain to think more creatively. If you already think outside the box, use this book to fine-tune your strategies and take your brainstorming sessions a few steps further.

3. Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger ($10): Powerful stories mixed with scientific studies are at the heart of this book about why things become popular and addictive among big groups of people. Right-brainers should tap into the book’s analytical approach while appreciating Berger’s deep understanding of human emotion.

4. Bossypants by Tina Fey ($6): If you don’t already love Tina Fey, you will after reading Bossypants. Her story is absolutely captivating from start to finish, as she shares experiences from her life as a creative and comedian, as well as the passion it took to build her career. Seeing her badass career unfold from such a personal POV will be a real treat.

5. Steal Like an Artist: 10 Things Nobody Told You About Being Creative by Austin Kleon ($7): A must-read for all, this book captures hallmark traits of right-brains and some of Kleon’s personal experiences as a young artist and writer. His 10 tips hail from a viral speech he once gave, and offer entertaining and practical advice for making the most of your artistic talents.

6. Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain: A Course in Enhancing Creativity and Artistic Confidence by Betty Edwards ($11): First released in 1979, this revamped edition features more than 40 new drawing exercises for igniting your right brain powers. Your ultimate goal should be learning this skill, keeping up with practice sessions, reaching mastery and then repeating the process with another creative activity.

7. Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear by Elizabeth Gilbert ($11): Gilbert’s instant best seller is a right brain’s dream, since it was written to help anyone live a creative life — without fear. Its pages cover finding inspiration, using emotion as power and filling each day with passion and mindfulness. Use it to unlock your fullest potential while pushing aside insecurity and doubt.

8. The Art of Discovery: Hollywood Stars Reveal Their Inspirations by Robin Bronk ($36): This coffee table book is sure to become a classic, with Hollywood’s most beautiful and fascinating celebs on each page. Bronk unlocks the art, emotion and empathy behind each person profiled, many of whom consider themselves creatives or right brains. Gain an understanding of the craft and how people navigate art as a career while fostering relationships.

9. Bittersweet: Thoughts on Change, Grace and Learning the Hard Way by Shauna Niequist ($10): This highly personal collection of essays is a heartwarming and sometimes heartbreaking read. Empathetic right-brains will appreciate Niequist’s honesty about how she found hope after terribly challenging events. The key lesson is that ordinary people can make a difference in strangers’ lives.

10. The Opposite of Loneliness: Essays And Stories by Marina Keegan ($11): Marina Keegan was an incredibly talented girl who worked hard to achieve her dreams. Sadly, she died in a car accident just after graduating from Yale University and right before she was slated to start her first job at The New Yorker. Her collection of essays and stories still delight, though, making them a perfect pick-me-up for artists, dramatics, feelers and thinkers.

11. The Empathy Exams by Leslie Jamison ($12): You’ll be hooked on this book from the first page, in which Jamison details her work as a medical actor to help students learn how to diagnose symptoms. From there, her essays begin to question the essence of humanity. Why do we care about each other? Can we feel each other’s pain? Her captivating quest for grace and understanding is sure to inspire your curiosity.

12. Chasers of the Light: Poems from the Typewriter Series by Tyler Knott Gregson ($12): When Tyler Knott Gregson found and fell in love with a typewriter, he discovered a brand new creative outlet that let him type his feelings without much hesitation. His raw (and revision-free) emotion spills across the pages, which are dedicated to life, love, people and things.

13. Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent and Lead by Brené Brown ($10): This #1 New York Times best seller is based on more than 12 years of intensive research, making it a must-read. Among countless thoughtful observations and lessons, Dr. Brené Brown digs deep to uncover the connection between vulnerability and other emotions like fear, innovation and love — and talks about how to find the courage to tap into empathy and creativity. If you have a tougher time letting down walls, you might try some of Brown’s suggestions for embracing more emotion.

Are you empathetic and creative? Do you consider yourself to be a ‘right brain’ thinker? Which books have you recently read and loved? Tell us @BritandCo!

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(Featured photo via Getty)