10 Small Business Brands Trying to Make the World a Better Place
Categories: Fashion

10 Small Business Brands Trying to Make the World a Better Place

Chances are when you think of a business that’s doing its part to positively impact the world, something like TOMS comes to mind. And while TOMS’s mission is totally admirable, there are a bunch of other small businesses who are following in their footsteps (pardon the pun). As you start to really move into Christmas shopping mode, be sure to check out these cool shops for a gift that gives not once, but twice.

1. Skyline Socks: Skyline socks features different socks with the iconic skylines of eight American cities on them. If you want to keep the goodwill local, this company should be at the top of your list, because for every pair you buy, a second pair will be donated to someone in that same city. (Photo via Skyline Socks)

2. Yoobi: This office supply brand is packed full of uber colorful pens, pencils and notebooks. For every Yoobi item you purchase, another item will be donated to a classroom in need, right here in the U.S. (Photo via @yoobi)

3. Naja: When you buy from this trendy lingerie line, your purchase is also supporting Naja’s Underwear for Hope program and their partnership with the Golondrinas Foundation, which teach single mothers and heads of the household to sew. The company’s founder primarily employs single mothers and the company regularly helps pay for school books, lunches and uniforms for their employees’ children. (Photo via Naja)

4. The Little Market: This company (co-founded by Lauren Conrad) is full of things like vibrant bags, beautiful woven goods and candles. Everything for sale on the website is made by female artisans from all over the world. The Little Market practices fair trade principles, and every purchase helps generate a meaningful income for artisans and their families. (Photo via @thelittlemarket)

5. Faucet Face: With every glass bottle you buy from Faucet Face, you’re essentially sending a minimum of 100 liters of clean water to families in India. Faucet Face works to install BioSand water filters in remote areas of India, which are able to eliminate 90-95% of impurities from contaminated water. (Photo via Faucet Face)

6. Roma: As the rainy season approaches, we recommend you look to Roma for a new pair of waterproof kicks. Roma is full of boots that feature fun colors and patterns. If you’re not big on the classic rain boot, they have a bunch of other styles that are a little less clunky but equally as practical. Following a one-to-one business model similar to TOMS, for every pair you buy, a pair is donated to impoverished children living in cold and wet climates. (Photo via @romaboots)

7. Sudara: Sudara offers loungewear packed with color and vibrant patterns. Everything the site offers is made ethically by women in India who have escaped human trafficking. Whenever you purchase a pair, essentially, you invest in the freedom and dignity of these women and girls working to start anew. Plus, if you were ever going to try the pajamas-as-outwear trend, a pair from this brand is definitely the way to go. (Photo via Sudara)

8. Sevenly: Here’s how it works: Every week, Sevenly highlights a new cause or charity partner and promotes them for seven days by designing and selling unique and beautifully designed apparel. For every item purchased from the apparel line associated with the featured cause, Sevenly then donates 7% of its profits to that partner. (Photo via @sevenly)

9. FEED: These classic, clean and super practical bags are making a major difference for starving children in impoverished communities. The company was founded by Lauren Bush, and every one of FEED’s products has a number stamped on it that signifies the number of school meals or micronutrient packets you’ve provided a child with your purchase.

10. The Giving Keys: There are a couple different reasons why we’re super obsessed with the trademark key necklaces this brand has to offer. Singer-songwriter Caitlin Crosby makes simple key necklaces with words like “hope” and “dream” on them. The idea is that you keep it for yourself and then give it away to a person you feel needs it more than you. Over 1,500 people have since shared their story online about why they gave away their piece. Additionally, the company employs people transitioning out of homelessness to help create all the jewelry you buy. (Photo via @thegivingkeys)

What’s a philanthropic brand you love? Share with us in the comments below.