How to Turn Hand-Stitched Embroidery into a Patch
Categories: DIY

How to Turn Hand-Stitched Embroidery into a Patch

DIY crushes are a thing, people. At least for us DIY nerds. Lately, I’ve been downright mad about embroidery. I’ll ditch my friends for it; I’ll stay up at night thinking about it… the devotion is REAL. Today, I’m taking this relationship to the next level: It’s time to make a hand-stitched patch out of this embroidery fling. How else can I wear my heart on my sleeve? (Let’s see how long we can keep this metaphor rolling, shall we?) Scroll on to see how simple it is to transform your beloved embroidery into a patch. Because really, who needs a boyfriend when you have a patch that will stick by (or to) your side?

I tackled this floral embroidery design while flying to New York. Seriously, this might be the best plane DIY I’ve found to date. It’s small and *just* time-consuming enough. And most airlines allow small scissors on board, so cutting embroidery thread is a cinch. Find some of B+C’s favorite embroidery patterns here!

Let’s jump right in!

Materials + Tools:

— hand-stitched embroidery

— muslin or canvas (about 4 x 4 inches)

Heat’n Bond Iron-On Adhesive

— embroidery thread

— embroidery hoop (or other circular object for tracing)

— fabric scissors

— pencil

— parchment paper

Fray Check (optional)

Instructions:

1. Draw a circle around your design. This will be the edge of your patch.

2. Cut a piece of Heat’n Bond to roughly the same size as your soon-to-be patch, then iron it onto the back of the embroidery according to instructions. Let it cool, then cut along the circular line.

3. Peel off the paper backing of the Heat’n Bond, then place the patch face-up on a piece of muslin or canvas. Cover the embroidery with a piece of parchment paper, then iron according to instructions. Once it has cooled, cut the back piece of muslin to size.

4. Stitch around the entire edge of the patch using a whip stitch.

5. When complete, trim the excess embroidery thread. If you like, seal the end with a drop of Fray Check.

6. Cut a piece of Heat’n Bond just smaller than your patch. Iron it onto the back of your patch.

7. Peel off the paper backing, then place onto the clothing you’ll be adhering it to. Cover the embroidery with a piece of parchment paper, then carefully iron it on. Wam, bam, thank you, ma’am!

Draw a circle around your design (I used the embroidery hoop to make this). This will be the edge of your patch.

Cut a piece of Heat’n Bond to roughly the same size as your soon-to-be patch, then iron it onto the back of the embroidery according to instructions. Let it cool, then cut along the circular line.

Peel off the paper backing of the Heat’n Bond, then place the patch face-up on a piece of muslin or canvas. Cover the embroidery with a piece of parchment paper, then iron according to instructions. Once it has cooled, cut the back piece of muslin to size.

Stitch around the entire edge of the patch using a whip stitch.

Pro Tip: If your muslin begins to fray as you stitch around the edge, outline the edge with a light coat of Fray Check. Let it dry before you continue stitching.

When complete, trim the excess embroidery thread.

If you like, seal the end with a drop of Fray Check.

Lookin’ good, li’l patchy!

To adhere it to clothing or any type of fabric, add a piece of Heat’n Bond just smaller than your patch, then iron it onto the back.

Peel off the paper backing, then place onto the clothing you’ll be adhering it to. This time I went with a plain baseball cap — the next one is going on my boyfriend jeans!

Cover the embroidery with a piece of parchment paper, then carefully iron it on.

Voila! Now sit back and wait for the compliments to roll on in.

Until next time! Peace out, Girl Scout.

Are you trying this DIY? We want to see the results! Share a photo on Instagram with the hashtag #iamcreative so we can check it out!

Photography: Chris Andre

Model: Maddie Bachelder

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