How to Save Your Skin After You Work Up a Sweat
Categories: Skincare

How to Save Your Skin After You Work Up a Sweat

We know you’re busy crushing your summer fitness #goals, whether you’re trying to run a 5K by Labor Day or make it to the top of the leader board in spin class. But while workin’ up a sweat is amazing for your bod, if you’re not careful, it can also be stressful for your skin. That’s why we tapped Michele Green, a New York City-based dermatologist, for her top tips for keeping our glow without any of the blemishes.

Brit + Co: Let’s be honest: We’re hustlin’ from work to make it to boot camp on time. Is it 100 percent necessary to take off all your makeup before you workout?

Michele Green: It is advisable to remove your facial foundation before exercising, since the foundation will contribute to creating blemishes. 

B+C: What exactly does sweat do to your skin? Does it really cause breakouts?

MG: Sweat cools your skin. It’s not harmful! However, sweat can cause breakouts by clogging your pores. The combination of sweat and residual makeup is not ideal.

B+C: OK, the workout’s done. (Crushed it!) Do you need to wash your face ASAP, or can you go home first and avoid locker room grime?

MG: After working up a sweat, it is best to wash your face and other acne prone areas such as back and chest to prevent breakouts. I often recommend using my MGSkinLabs Retexturizing Pads ($65) for oil control immediately after exercise to prevent or treat potential blemishes on the face, chest, or back.

B+C: Any other tips for working out and keeping your skin looking amazing?

MG: It’s also good to keep your hair off of your face and neck during exercise because the oils can contribute to acne. Also, exercise equipment like mats and other gym equipment can be contaminated with bacteria, so it is best to wash off exposed areas after exercising to prevent damage to your complexion.

What are your top tips for keeping your skin looking ahmazing after working out? Tell us on Twitter @BritandCo!

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(Photos via Getty)