3 iPhone Camera Tricks You Should Do Every Time You Take a Pic
Categories: Tech

3 iPhone Camera Tricks You Should Do Every Time You Take a Pic

It’s likely that unless you have an avid fascination with photography or you’re an actual pro, our smartphone cams have replaced point-and-shoots — sometimes even DSLRs (psst, in case you do have a DSLR, we’re offering a DSLR online class to help you master that too!). Given that more iPhone photos are being shot every day, here are a couple of handy dandy tricks to turn you into an iPhone camera pro so you can get that perfect shot every time.

1. Adjust lighting as you focus. We’ve all been there. You’re trying to snap the perfect shot, but it’s simply too dark. You can brighten the exposure on your camera by tapping the screen to focus the shot and simply sliding your finger up and down the screen to adjust the brightness of the image.

2. Lock in your AE/AF. Now that you know how to adjust the lighting, you should also know how to lock that in. AE/AF stands for auto-exposure/auto-focus lock. You can easily focus your iPhone camera by tapping the screen when you’re in your camera. Holding down your finger to focus (for approximately two seconds) will automatically lock in the focus and lighting that you want for a series of photos — so you don’t have to keep adjusting and refocusing after each shot. Of course, this only works if the lighting is the same.

3. Achieve the perfect crop every time. Did you know you can actually perfectly crop your image from directly within your iPhone’s photo app? You can achieve this by going into Photos and selecting the image you want. Then, from the upper right hand corner, tap on Edit. Once you get to the Edit screen, you’ll see a little symbol for various cropping sizes in the bottom right hand corner. Tap on that, and it brings up a pop up that will allow you to choose if you’d like a a perfect square crop, 2:3, 3:5 and several more options. Handy!

Will you be trying out any of these tricks? Tweet us @BritandCo!

(Reese photo via Christopher Polk/Getty)