These White Shirts Are Totally Unstainable (Yes, Really)
Categories: Fashion

These White Shirts Are Totally Unstainable (Yes, Really)

Clumsy people, rejoice. No longer do you have to bring a spare shirt on those days when you feel brave enough to wear white. There’s now a shirt that’s 100% unstainable — coffee, red wine, ketchup, it’s all fair game. This monumental day in science has been brought to you by the basics brand Elizabeth and Clark. The NY label launched a Kickstarter on April 21 and has already received more than 4x its goal.

So, how does this sorcery work? The shirts are coated with tiny unstainable fibers (100,000x smaller than a grain of sand), which keep water and oil-based items suspended above the fabric, never allowing them to seep into the material. Their Kickstarter page breaks it down best by explaining that their technology work similarly to how flowers manage to repel morning dew, with the water simply sitting atop the surface rather than soaking in.

If you’re thinking this shirt is going to feel like a super tight windbreaker, you’d be sorely mistaken. The revolutionary unstainable fibers have been implemented into four different styles: the White, the Liz Lemon, the Arden and the Parker. Three are made of Crepe de Chine (AKA silk) and one is made from a mix of cotton and modal. The silky blouses are all button-downs (there is a long sleeve, sleeveless and collarless), while the cotton/modal shirt is a casual, pocketed tee. We’re thinking one of each might be necessary.

Although these are made using a totally innovative technology, you’d never know it by the price. Donate to their Kickstarter and you can snag the cotton tee for $25 or any blouse for $50. If you’re all about this idea, you can also pledge $65 and get a tee + any blouse (still, a killer deal). There’s no mention as to what these miracle tops will cost post-Kickstarter, so we’d suggest snagging one before their campaign ends. You’ll thank us next time you decide it’d be a great idea to hit the dance floor, glass of vino in hand.

Which unstainable shirt style do you like best? Share with us in the comments below.