30 Under 30 Makers + Shakers: Home and Food
Categories: Brit's Blog

30 Under 30 Makers + Shakers: Home and Food

Y’all ready for this? It’s time for the next installment of our Makers + Shakers series! We’ve teamed up with PayPal to introduce you to 30 makers under 30 who are shaking up their respective industries. We kicked things off with makers in the fashion, beauty and jewelry industry. Their stories about what inspires creativity were truly motivating. We also shared PayPal’s Voices video, in which they highlight what they’ve described as the new People Economy. Be sure to give it a watch, if you haven’t yet.  Oh, and if you’re lightning-fast and hit pause at 0:23, you might just see me!

Now, on to our next batch of incredibly talented makers. This post is all about folks in the home and food industry. Read on for more!

Arian Blanco, 28

Arian is the founder of Sweet Lady Cook, a company that handcrafts seasonal, small batch jams in Southern California. All of the ingredients in her delicious concoctions are grown and sourced locally, which means her jams are not only fresh, but the flavors change with the seasons.

In five words or less, tell us why you love to make. 

Making to me is happiness.

Where do you get your inspiration?

I can always find inspiration at one of our local farmers markets. Here in California we’re fortunate enough to have high quality, responsibly grown produce available year round.

How has being a part of the people economy changed your life? 

I think as a consumer many of us feel disconnected from the products we purchase. Being a part of a people economy has really changed that for me.

Sarah Jones, 29

Sarah is the founder of SF-based Miss Jones Baking Co. She makes all-natural, ready-to-use frostings, baking mixes and baking kits. The ice cream sundae cupcakes kit is one of our faves. Sarah also happens to be a member of the B+C team so we can definitely vouch for the deliciousness. :)

In five words or less, tell us why you love to make. 

Baking brings people joy!

Where do you get your inspiration?

BLOGS! I am so inspired by the many talented bloggers out there — they are producing an incredible amount of beautiful images and ideas that I draw inspiration from every day. I love how blogging and the maker movement empower people to embrace, pursue and share their passions and creativity with the world.

How has being a part of the people economy changed your life? 

I feel more connected to others and more passionate about my work and life. It’s incredible to have the opportunity to make and share something you love with others.

Adam Higginbotham, 27

Adam is the co-founder of Austin-based Liber & Co. He makes artisanal cocktail syrups with co-founders Robert Higginbotham and Chris Harrison. We can’t get enough of their Texas Grapefruit Shrub. It’s next level.

In five words or less, tell us why you love to make.

Living, learning and drinking better.

Where do you get your inspiration?

We’re fortunate to be in Austin and to have access to some really incredible cocktail bars. So many talented and creative bartenders around the country are ensuring that people today are drinking better than ever. The opportunity to make syrups with the same quality and attention to detail as those made in top cocktail bars excites us every day. We think people should be able to re-create the craft cocktails they love for family and friends in the comfort of their own home-bar.

How has being a part of the people economy changed your life?

People are more connected today than ever before, and for companies like ours that means more opportunities to reach people directly and sustain a grassroots approach beyond our local market. We’ve literally built our business on the exchange of access between our authentic bar syrups and the consumers around the country who appreciate them — small, artisanal makers were previously much more limited in terms of market growth. Through the social media and technology channels available today, dedicated artisans enjoy much greater reach than we could have imagined a decade ago.

Anna Ritchie, 28

Anna is the founder of Your Nest Inspired. As an accomplished woodworker, she makes beautiful home goods and tech-cessories. Her iPad and iPhone stands are stylish and functional.

In five words or less, tell us why you love to make.

Creating thoughtful over mass produced.

Where do you get your inspiration?

I am inspired by everyday life, creating items that I need, in a clean, simple, and functional way.  My products are then taken to the next level when I introduce them to the world.  I examine how they are used by customers in order to constantly develop new and improving ideas.

How has being a part of the people economy changed your life?

Being a part of the people economy has allowed me to grow my business, doing what I love and sharing it with similar-minded people throughout the globe. Amongst a world of plastic and technology, I use my hands to bring customers back to earth with natural woods.  In an otherwise fast-paced lifestyle, I am able to slow down for a minute, to connect with others, discuss, and understand their specific needs.  This allows me to make one-of-a-kind products, inspired by the users themselves.

Francesca Greggs, 27

Francesca is a designer, illustrator and founder of Lemonwood Imprints. Her witty cards (like this one or this one) are guaranteed to make you LOL. We’re obsessed with everything that comes out of her SF studio!

In five words or less, tell us why you love to make.

Connecting with others through creativity.

Where do you get your inspiration?

Lately I’ve been energized by vintage textiles, old movies and children’s books, architecture, and as always, nature and travel.

How has being a part of the people economy changed your life?

My work is very personal by nature, both in that I am intimately involved in making each piece beautiful and also because my intention is to make customers feel excited about my products. I’m trying to create things I love and always hope that other people feel the same way. Being a part of the “people’s economy” and having the ability to share directly with customers and collaborate personally with other artists has not only changed my life but helped define it.

Britt Bass Turner, 25

Britt Bass Turner is an abstract artist based in Atlanta. She’s the founder of design studio Britt Bass Turner. By stocking up on a few of her colorful prints, you’ll be one step closer to the salon wall of your dreams.

In five words or less, tell us why you love to make.

Freeing, intuitive, infinite, challenging.

Where do you get your inspiration?

Everyone and everything. I consume visual information in all forms in everyday routines and trend-watching. I’m constantly refining my eye to sort through it all and define my aesthetic. It’s as much about consumption of information as it is about the down time to recharge that inspires me to get back in the studio!

How has being a part of the people economy changed your life?

Being a part of the people economy has created and sustained my business and continues to prove integral as we move forward. We strive to be connected with our clients and fans, accessible and most of all authentic. Not only have these values made my craft viable, they have completely changed my experience as a consumer. I choose products and services as a result of my personal connection through a manifesto, customer service, loyalty, and transparency.

Julie Astrauckas, 30

Julie is a blogger, greeting card designer and DIY lover. She’s the founder of Orange County-based Julie Ann Art. Her unique greeting cards always put a smile on our faces. This one might be the best.

In five words or less, tell us why you love to make.

It encourages self-expression.

Where do you get your inspiration?

Since I focus on creating a relatable product, I draw most of my inspiration from actual relationships, conversations, and daily life.

How has being a part of the people economy changed your life?

Far beyond the fact that I am able to pursue my own business full-time, being a part of the people economy has allowed me to create true relationships with customers, fellow business owners, and supporters across the world.

Evan Loewy, 27

Evan is one half of the duo behind The Other Brother Company. Evan and his brother, Ben Loewy, make organic olive oil on their farm in the Bay Area. Get cookin’ with their extra-virgin blend.

In five words or less, tell us why you love to make.

For the love and livelihood.

Where do you get your inspiration?

Our family, our community, nature and skateboarding

How has being a part of the people economy changed your life?

The people economy has helped us tremendously. We are always on the road, between our orchards and our office. It’s important for us to stay connected to our community when we are away.  It’s empowering to use technology to be able to provide a safe, secure, simple and unique shopping experience. We’re able to make sales as well as market and manage our business through online platforms like Brit + Co, Instagram and PayPal. The climate of the people economy and the combination of these services has made it possible to operate without the overhead of a brick and mortar. With the savings from these platforms we have been able to invest more in the quality of our products and spend more time connecting to our customers, getting feedback and focusing on the “Good Goods.”

Caitlin Halberstadt, 29

Caitlin is the founder of design company Bright July. She makes hand-appliqued throw pillows in her Denver studio. With fun sayings like “carpe diem” and “YOLO,” they’ll add a punch to any room in your home.

In five words or less, tell us why you love to make.

Because making creates connection.

Where do you get your inspiration? 

My inspiration comes from celebrating life and love. I love the idea that a Carpe Diem (or Carpe Noctem) pillow is a little reminder to live the day well, or that a Te Amo or Je T’aime pillow can send a simple message of love from one person to another. Nothing makes me happier than imagining my little pillows taking on a new life, encouraging people I’ve never met and becoming a little part of their lives and stories.

How has being a part of the people economy changed your life?

I am regularly amazed by the notion that I can create and sustain a life for myself through connecting directly with my wonderful customers. I am privileged to be part of a new age of online commerce where this is possible. I spend my days dreaming up new designs, making things I adore, and sending them all over the world. The fact that these amazing communities and opportunities exist for makers like myself is a beautiful thing. Without the existence of this new economy of connection, my career as it is would not be possible — so my life is truly changed.

Michael Adams, 26

Michael is the founder of gourmet mustard company Green Mountain Mustard. Made in Vermont, his mustards range from classic to wacky flavors. We’re talking Sriracha mustard, everything bagel mustard and more.

In five words or less, tell us why you love to make.

Passion is creativity in disguise.

Where do you get your inspiration?

I listen to our customers and make unique twists on their recommendations. I’ll also find a flavor combination I love and make a blend for a new flavor — that’s how we came up with Deli Dirt. I love everything bagels. And apparently, the world does, too!

How has being a part of the people economy changed your life?

In the people economy, I’m able to tell my story. I can get a small group of people behind me to carry me through to success. By building real, true relationships with thousands of customers, any company can grow organically. Plus, who doesn’t love talking to new people? Their stories are more amazing than mine!

What do YOU think of these makers and shakers? Drop us a line on Twitter!

This post is a collaboration with PayPal