Where almond and round eyes are characterized by their ovular shape, hooded eyes are defined by their lack of visible lid space between the lash line and brow bone. When you have hooded peepers — like Gabrielle Union above and Jennifer Lawrence below — skin droops from your brow bone down over where your crease should be, effectively hiding it from plain view. “The easiest way to differentiate whether or not you have hooded eyes is first to ask yourself, ‘Do I have a visible crease?'” MŌDA Brush makeup artist Dominique Lerma says. If the answer is no, it’s time to look at the corners of your eyes. “If the outer corners neither pull up or down, then you have hooded lids,” she says. (Photo via Steve Granitz/ Getty)

While a noticeable crease may seem inconsequential, it can determine how to create a flawlessly made-up lid. Certain statement looks (like smoky blends and cat eyes) may be harder to achieve on your lid type. To help you navigate the nuances of your eye shape, ahead you’ll learn a handful of hooded eye makeup tips to slay your #MOTD each and every day.

five tips to master hooded eye makeup

1. Pick a primer. “My favorite trick is to invest in a sturdy eyeshadow primer, as shadows are more likely to smudge and easily transfer on hooded lids,” Lerma says. Whichever primer you use, resist the urge to blend it in using your finger. “Although one with hooded eyes might not be subject to oily skin, the lid area tends to oxidize quicker and it’s always recommended to apply the shadow base/primer with a brush instead of adding personal oils from our fingertips,” Lerma explains. (Photo via Steve Granitz/ Getty)

2. Create a fake crease. If you want to mimic the look of a larger lid, you can use your eye makeup to mirror the appearance of a visible crease. NYC-based celebrity makeup artist Tobi Henney says to apply the shadow of your choice onto the hood of your eye with window-wiper blending strokes and a small tapered makeup brush. Then use a liner to mimic a fake crease on hooded eyes. “Draw small strokes using the liner and blend it out with a soft makeup brush,” Henney, who works with Bambi Northwood Blyth (a runway model with hooded lids), says.

3. Watch yourself. “Hooded shadow techniques are best created when looking directly ahead in the mirror,” Henney says. “When the eyes are open, the color does not become lost in the crease.”

Any eye makeup can perform a disappearing act on drooped lids, but none are quite as tricky as winged liner. To prevent your crisp cat eye from slipping out of view, Lerma says to trace liner along your upper waterline with your eyes open or closed. When you reach the outer corner, open and gently pull your lid in an upward slant to copycat the direction you want your wing to stretch. Using a steady hand, follow your uplifted lid’s lead and trace out to the end of where your want your wing tip to be, and then back towards the lash line. “For beginners attempting a winged line, I recommend using a business card — holding it at an upward slant toward the end of the brow — to create a razor-sharp tip,” Lerma says. “Be sure to [use thin lines to begin with] as it’s easier to retrace thicker lines than it is to remove a waterproof liner.”

4. Devise a distraction from your invisible crease. If you want to embrace a more almond-like lid, heed Henney’s advice: “Curl your lashes, apply mascara, and add a few individual lashes to the outer corners of your eyes to create a more feline look that will take the focus away from hooded lids.”

5. Rely on waterproof eye makeup products. “A statement eye is doable on a hooded lid so long as you always — and I mean always — use waterproof liner and transfer-resistant shadows to prevent any smudges,” Lerma says.

Do you have hooded lids? Tell us @BritandCo!