This Notebook Instantly Syncs Your Handwriting to Your Phone
Categories: Tech

This Notebook Instantly Syncs Your Handwriting to Your Phone

Fact: You learn more when you write than you do when you type. Not to mention, that feeling of a brand new pen gliding over a crisp white piece of paper is pretty satisfying. And being able to doodle “Mrs. Ryan Gosling” in the corner of our paper while someone prattles on in your weekly recap meeting is the way we keep our sanity. The only downside to the mighty pen and notebook is that translating those handwritten masterpieces to your laptop can be a pain. But thanks to the latest in smart notebook technology, that might not be a problem any more.

A few years back Moleskine teamed up with Evernote to create an ultimate tool for any creative note-taker. While these cool pads were innovative, there were still several hurdles to jump over. For example, you had to take photos of your handwritten notes with your smartphone in order to upload them to digital files.

Now Moleskine has branched out on its own, and the results are better than anything we could have imagined. The new Livescribe Notebook looks unassuming. And that’s because the secret is in the paper.

The paper contains special dots that send digital signals to your pen as you write, tracking your movements. The pen then sends a message to your tablet or computer, where your notes are translated on-screen. Which means that as you write, your notes are instantly transformed into digital files — creative drawings, doodles, graphs and all.

It’s okay if you need to take a moment to squeal with excitement. We sure did. The notebook converts your handwriting into editable (and readable) text directly on your screen. It also lets you link notes with recorded audio, tag pages for later and transfer over any drawings by tracking pen strokes. While they aren’t for sale yet, you can pre-order one for only $30. If that’s not a bargain, we don’t know what is.

What do you think of this smart notebook trend? Do you like the idea of translating your notes to digital works, or do you prefer to keep things on good old-fashioned pen and paper?