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We Gave This Thanksgiving Stuffing Recipe a Paleo-Friendly Makeover That Everyone Will Love

Oh, Thanksgiving dressing. The love for it is real, which is why we can’t forgo it this year, even though we’re on a paleo (or Whole30) diet. Our vegetable- and protein-packed recipe will help curb your cravings, while allowing you to enjoy Thanksgiving leftovers with fewer, or um, no regrets. This Thanksgiving stuffing recipe isn’t just for the Whole30/paleo crowd. In addition to being devoid of gluten, dairy, and sugar, the stuffing can easily be vegan if you don’t add in the pork.

We’ve ditched the bread for more nutrient-dense, carb-like fillers such as roasted celeriac(that’s the root of celery!), chopped chestnuts, and chopped walnuts. Feel free to sauté diced apples into your aromatics if you prefer a sweeter dressing. Texturally, this isn’t quite like the bread pudding-like texture of traditional stuffing, but the flavor is 100 percent Thanksgiving deliciousness!

We loved it so much that after making it the first time, we made a veggie version the next week. We tossed in some dried cherries and topped it with grated cheddar cheese for a weeknight dinner that pulls together pretty quickly. Its leftovers also taste incredible when laid out on a sheet tray with Brussels sprouts and roasted until nice and caramelized.

Recipe Notes: This can certainly be made a couple of days before serving. Simply prepare a 2-quart (8-inch by 10-inch) casserole dish with paleo-compliant non-stick spray, and refrigerate the dressing, covered, until ready to use. Reheat in the oven for up to an hour at 375°F. Find the chestnuts at your local Williams-Sonoma, Trader Joe’s, or health food store. We used the Matiz brand found through Instacart.

(Recipe via Ashley Bare/Brit + Co; photos via Kurt Andre/Brit + Co)

Ditch the bread easily!

We Gave This Thanksgiving Stuffing Recipe a Paleo-Friendly Makeover That Everyone Will Love

Oh, Thanksgiving dressing. The love for it is real, which is why we can’t forgo it this year, even though we’re on a paleo (or Whole30) diet. Our vegetable- and protein-packed recipe will help curb your cravings, while allowing you to enjoy Thanksgiving leftovers with fewer, or um, no regrets. This Thanksgiving stuffing recipe isn’t just for the Whole30/paleo crowd. In addition to being devoid of gluten, dairy, and sugar, the stuffing can easily be vegan if you don’t add in the pork.

We’ve ditched the bread for more nutrient-dense, carb-like fillers such as roasted celeriac(that’s the root of celery!), chopped chestnuts, and chopped walnuts. Feel free to sauté diced apples into your aromatics if you prefer a sweeter dressing. Texturally, this isn’t quite like the bread pudding-like texture of traditional stuffing, but the flavor is 100 percent Thanksgiving deliciousness!

We loved it so much that after making it the first time, we made a veggie version the next week. We tossed in some dried cherries and topped it with grated cheddar cheese for a weeknight dinner that pulls together pretty quickly. Its leftovers also taste incredible when laid out on a sheet tray with Brussels sprouts and roasted until nice and caramelized.

Recipe Notes: This can certainly be made a couple of days before serving. Simply prepare a 2-quart (8-inch by 10-inch) casserole dish with paleo-compliant non-stick spray, and refrigerate the dressing, covered, until ready to use. Reheat in the oven for up to an hour at 375°F. Find the chestnuts at your local Williams-Sonoma, Trader Joe’s, or health food store. We used the Matiz brand found through Instacart.

(Recipe via Ashley Bare/Brit + Co; photos via Kurt Andre/Brit + Co)

Ingredients

  • 5 cups diced celeriac, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided
  • freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 24 ounces cremini and/or white button mushrooms, quartered
  • 3/4 cup chopped celery
  • 1 cup diced carrots
  • 2 cups diced yellow onion
  • 2 pounds ground pork
  • 5 cloves garlic, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes (or more if you like heat)
  • 2 teaspoons whole fennel seed, slightly crushed in mortar and pestle
  • about 30 sage leaves (or more if you like), minced
  • 13 ounces whole, peeled, ready-to-use chestnuts
  • 2 cups raw walnut halves and pieces

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Prepare two separate baking sheets by lining them with parchment paper.

In a medium mixing bowl, toss the diced celeriac with 1/4 cup olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, and some freshly ground black pepper. Turn celeriac out onto a prepared baking sheet.

Repeat the same process with the mushrooms, by tossing in 1/4 cup olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, and freshly ground black pepper, to taste. Tossed mushrooms will go on another prepared baking sheet.

Roast celeriac and mushrooms for 30-40 minutes, rotating halfway through cook time. Celeriac should be slightly browned and just tender. Mushrooms will shrivel and brown quite a bit. Once roasted, remove from the oven and add them to a large mixing bowl.

Meanwhile, in a medium skillet over medium-high heat, heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil. Then add the celery, carrots, onion, 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, and freshly ground black pepper. Sauté, stirring occasionally, for about 15 minutes or until veggies have softened slightly and are a bit caramelized. Remove to the same large mixing bowl as the celeriac and mushrooms.

As veggies caramelize, use a food processor to chop the chestnuts and walnuts separately by pulsing the blade about 10 times for each. Chestnut and walnut pieces should be roughly the size of a jelly bean or slightly larger. Add each to the large mixing bowl.

In the same skillet as the veggies, sauté the pork, garlic, crushed red pepper flakes, fennel seed, sage, 1 teaspoon kosher salt, and freshly ground black pepper over medium-high heat, stirring constantly, for about 10 minutes or until pork is cooked through and crumbly. Remove to the same large mixing bowl.

Gently toss the entire mixture, scooping from the bottom.

Transfer to a casserole or serving dish. Serve immediately, or cover and refrigerate to reheat later.

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Raising children can be tough, especially if you've never done it before. Friends and family can be a great support system but it's nice to be able to hang out with other moms who share your interests and parenting style. This was the motivation Peanut, the social networking app designed to help moms find their tribe. Since it's launch, Peanut has become a premier destination for moms and moms-to-be to foster relationships through motherhood.

Today, the app deemed "Tinder for Moms" unveils a new platform, Trying to Conceive (TTC), a space for women on their journey to conceive. Peanut TTC is the first digital community that offers women on assisted fertility journeys and considering alternatives to pregnancy, a community of support through shared experience. The app also offers a space for women who have experienced miscarriage or infant loss.

The CDC reports that 1 in 8 couples in the U.S. experience infertility, and although advances in medicine and technology can increase the chances of conception, they don't address the overlooked emotional and mental toll that comes with the process — anxiety, loneliness, and depression. These issues fueled the Founder and CEO of Peanut, Michelle Kennedy, to develop Peanut TTC.

Founder and CEO of the Peanut App

Brit + Co: How have you seen the conversation and connection surrounding motherhood change since the birth of the Peanut app?

Michelle Kennedy: With any relationship, including those we have with apps and tech, there is always an initial trust-building period. For moms, and new moms especially, this is crucial. They're asking questions about their children, nothing could be more precious. Beyond that, there is a vulnerability as a new mom that I can't quite put into words. It's an incredibly scary and lonely moment in your life. And when we don't know or understand something, we tend to hide. However, as Peanut has grown, we've seen the opposite than one might expect when it comes to connection and vulnerability. The bigger the community, the more intimate conversations amongst women have become. Women have full trust in each other, and in the app — because of how we build it, and because of how we protect our community. They share everything. They help each other in times of need. They laugh together. They meet up and they build lifelong relationships. At Peanut we have been able to scale with intimacy, and that is a major accomplishment of the women on the app.

B + C: Do you use the app yourself?

MK: I can say with full confidence, that I have used Peanut every day since its inception — save for the birth of my children. And even then, there's a fair chance I was in-app for a moment or two. I love watching our community grow. I am a part of that community. I laugh and cry alongside these women. Sometimes I check in during a 4 am feed, and just reading comments and threads from other women gives me a sense of calm. I built something that I would use. It only makes sense that I use it.

Peanut TTC App Screenshot

B+C: Why did you decide to expand with TTC?

MK: Very much like Peanut, Peanut TTC was born from a real need. We know moms need support and comfort and community. They want to be able to chat in trusted environments. Women going through fertility journeys need that equally, if not more. For both the most patent reasons and for the emotional battles of TTC that are kept in the shadows or shrouded by the science of it all. Primarily, it's just not easy to find another woman who is on a TTC journey -- it's not as obvious. There are no visual signals for a woman who has experienced loss or who is trying for a baby. A mother may even have a child by her side, and yet is struggling to conceive baby #2.

B + C: What problems do you see or experience associated with motherhood? What stigmas still need to be broken?

MK: Oh, where does one start? As I am a working mother, I can speak on that specifically. There is this idea that motherhood distracts you, makes you less employable — we see this all the time. Women are replaced during maternity leave. They are scared to reveal pregnancies to employers. Job security is a major concern. There are so many backward notions about this, but these fears are also built on the notion that raising children is solely a woman's job. No one ever asks a new dad how he's going to work and manage a newborn. No one ever asks a father-to-be if he's going to come back to work after the baby is born. Why? We all know why. And it's a detriment to modern motherhood.

B+C: What are your hopes surrounding women and the conversation of motherhood in the future? What does that community look like?

MK: This digital community is the signal — the lighthouse, if you will, for women who feel alone. It's the heart behind the science. All are invited into this compassionate and community-driven space. These women comfort each other. Share. And ultimately, no matter where their journey takes them, they take care of each other. Additionally, the more we speak about our experiences, the less isolating they become. Peanut TCC shines a light on what is often a silent struggle.

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